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LETTERS FROM VISITORS & FRIENDS

Write to:   g.gefaell<at>mundo-r<dot>com    (Substitute <at> by "@" and <dot> by ".")



March 3, 2012
An interesting correspondence regarding Fishers

Dear Mr. Gefaell,
It's very interesting to read articles and to compare different M/S characteristics and models.
And a pleasure to see photos.
Thank you for maintaining your site (http://www.xente.mundo-r.com/motorsailers/what_s_.htm)!
Just wanted to tell you, on your "Monohulls" page(http://www.xente.mundo-r.com/motorsailers/monohulls.htm), under Fisher-37 entry, there is actually a photo of Fisher-46..
I am interested in Fishers for many years, I have a Northshore brochure, and that's the same photo as in the brochure: Fisher-46, that's for sure.
I myself just got back home from Lisbon – I bought ..... a Fisher 34 based now in Sines.
My best regards to you,
V. M.


Dear V.M.
May be I'm wrong but I think that my image could be either from a ketch rigged Fisher 34 (two lateral windows at the wheelhouse) or then from a two windowed 37 (most probably), but never a 46. See the attached image from a F 46 and this link to the selling page of a two lateral windows 37:
http://www.cosasdebarcos.com/galeria-fotos-barco-fisher-37-ketch-sold-56585120060670695165706855504569.html
Kind regards.
Guillermo.



Dear Guillermo,
Really, two lateral wheelhouse windows are mostly seen on Fisher-34; but either on Fisher-37 as you have shown, and, as my brochure shows – on Fisher-46!
Exactly as with Fisher-37 you can have two or three lateral windows on Fisher-46.
I am sure your photo is Fisher-46 because I have a  Northshore brochure, but I understand your concern.. To try to persuade you, please pay attention: your yellow-hulled Fisher has no cockpit, she has hard (wooden) side-rails instead of usual life-lines on smaller Fishers, her raised decks (except in the forward part of it) are extended sideways toward her sides (no bulwarks here); and  look at the portholes here (the number of them and where they are), and, finally, at her powerful main-boom..
I included the Fisher-34 photo from the Northshore web-site (that's the one I buy): you can see her small side-decks are lower than her house (same as with Fisher-37) – in contrast with Fisher-46 where her side-decks are the same level with the house.
If you are still not sure – I'll try to find my brochure (still could not) – then I'll be able to copy it for you.
My best regards to you,
V.M.


June 20, 2011
Chris provided some other data, and asuming a crew of 6 and doing some wild guessing, I got the following numbers for the Triangle 32 MS:

INPUT
Hull length (m) =
9,75
Waterline length (m) =
8,18
Maximum beam (m) =
3,05
Floatation beam (m) =
2,75
Total draught (m) =
1,35
Body draught (m) =
0,70
Moulded depth (m) =
1,98
Freeboard (m) =
1,28
Displacement (kg) =
5.439
Ballast  (kg) =
2.343
IJPE area  (m2) =
35,72
Air draft (m) =
12,22
Heeling arm (m) =
5,32
Engine power  (HP) =
45
I (m) =
10,36
J (m) =
3,35
P (m) =
9,14
E (m) =
4,02
Height keel (approx.) =
0,65
Length keel (approx.) =
3
OUTPUT (with some assumptions)
Block coeffcient =
0,34
Prismatic coefficient =
0,56
Waterplane coefficient =
0,7
Main section coefficient =
0,6
(2Lwl+Lh)/3Bmax Ratio =
2,85
Lwl/Bwl Ratio =
2,98
Length/Draught Ratio =
7,22
Beam/Draught Ratio =
2,26
Beam waterline/Body draught =
3,92
Ballast/Displacement Ratio =
0,43
Displacement/Length Ratio =
277
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio =
11,74
Sail Area/Wetted surface =
1,65
SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.) =
0,79
Power/ Disp. Ratio (HP/Ton) =
3,75
Hull speed (kn) =
6,94
Potential Maximum Speed (kn) =
6,75
Velocity Ratio =
0,97
Efficient motoring speed (kn) =
5,70
Capsize Safety Factor =
1,75
Motion Comfort Ratio =
30,2
Heft  Ratio =
1,17
Moment of Inertia (kg*m2) =
15425,81
Roll Period (sec) =
3,44
Roll Acceleration (G's) =
0,06
Stability Index =
1,13
Angle of Vanishing Stability (º) =
134
Upright Heeling Moment (kg*m) =
963,64
Righting Moment at 1º (kg*m) =
49,90
Heeling Moment at 20º (kg*m) =
819,11
Righting Moment at 20º(kg*m) =
895,54
Dellenbaugh Angle (º) 14kn wind =
19,31
Wind pressure coefficient =
1,09
Initial Metacentric height (m) =
0,53
Angle of vanishing stability (º) =
134
Asumed downflooding angle (º) =
90
GZ at downflooding angle (m) =
0,35
GZ at 90 degrees (m) =
0,35
Area to downflooding  (m*deg) =
29,03
Area to AVS (m*deg) =
36,73
STIX (to MOC displacement) =
25,2
Design Category =
B



June 19, 2011
From Chris Hadden:
(Guillermo's note: To be able to work out all numbers for this boat I need to know the highlighted in red data. Anybody can help?)

Boat's name: Miss Brenda Jean
Boat Make & Model: Triangle 32 Motorsailer
Hull Length: 32 feet
Waterline Length: 26.83 feet
Beam (Maximum): 10 feet
Beam at waterline (if known. Otherwise 0.9 Bmax): 9 feet
Keel draught and type: 3.5 feet
Body Draught amidships (best guess): ?
Displacement (specify load condition): 12,000 dry
Ballast: Encased 5,170 Lbs
Sail Area (I,J,P,E based or approximate): 34, 11, 30, 13.20 feet
Height of mast over water (bridge clearance): 40
EC Directive or IMS's STIX number (specify):?
Engine's continuous HP: 45
Your years of cruising/sailing experience: 20
Best suited use of the boat (Oceanic, coastal, etc).: coastal


Photos here:  http://www.cameojewelrysupply.com/1964-Triangle-Pilothouse-Motorsailer-W9C96.aspx


Something about the TRIANGLE MARINE boats here: http://www.grampianowners.com/triangle_marine_boats.htm



June 14, 2011
From Fred Nawrot:
Thank you for the article on MortorSailing. I  enjoyed it very much...I may not have understood it all, but it was great..I am building a small boat that will be a motor sailor when finished.
Fred


Dec 19, 2010
From Tony Grunt, of the Spurt 25 Motorsailer owners' association
Hello
The message below was on your great motorsailer site:

August 01, 2009
Rob Murray in Halifax, Canada, needs some help:
I m considering purchasing the attached motorcruiser, however the seller does not know the manufacturer and model.  
Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
The motorsailer in the pictures is as follows:
Mulder & Rijke. Lemmer, Holland.
"Spurt 25 ak" (ak is for aft cabin) comes also with open aft arrangement.
Building year in the 70`s
The company was taken over by ONJ, Netherland,
The hull design is used for peasure and workboats also to date.
Tony Grant Spurt 25 ak owner Denmark
Sailer greetings & a Merry Christmas
PS: Spurt owners website:
WWW.mijnONJ.NL


November 29, 2010
From Enrico Gabbai in Florence -ITALY
Dear Sir,
here find attached a pic of our Doggersbank motorsailer , Lady Evelyn III-
We use it in the mediteranean sea extensively during our summer vacation , and as our weekend floating house.
If you like to know details , please ask-
The short rig allows to keep full sails with moderate to strong winds  20-26knots-
We keep always the engine on reducing revolutions as the wind help us .
I feel that a motorsailer is the best of both worlds, even if ours is more incline to motor rather sailing but the aquired stability , and propultion help is a enormous advantage on a motor yacht.
we have plenty of redudancy on the power line , one Daewoo 320hp, and two old Mercedes benz of 60hp moving featherable propellers, one hydraulik 220v cruising generator and a second generator on the starboard small engine.
a complete hydraulic system for , stabilizers , bow thruster , anchor windlass, capstan and emergency bilge pump- Home appliancies are washer + drier+ ceramic cooktop , oven , microwave , two refrigerators and two freezers.
Complete nav system etc.
Best regards and compliments for keeping a lovely website.
Enrico Gabbai
Florence -ITALY
 

boatname = Lady Evelyn III ex Aequebusier IV
make/model = Doggersbank 1750
hull length = 17,50 meters
waterlinelength = 15,80 meters
beam maximum = 5,10 meters
waterline beam = 4,90
keel = 1,70
bodydraught = 1,70
displacement = 60 t
ballast = unknown
sail area = 72 square meters
mastheight = main about 15 meters and mizzen about 13 meters
stix =
hp = 320hp
experience = since 2001  with this boat
use = all over
comments = Steel built in 1982 in holland, design and engeneering by Vripack (Dick Boon). Design definition as a auxiliary sailing motor yacht. A side of the main engine we have two lateral engines of 60hp each for tight maneuvers and redundancy


Some ratios for her:
Length/Beam Ratio
(2Lwl + Lh)/3B =
3,21
Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
3,22
Length/Draught Ratio
Lh/T =
10,29
Beam/Draught Ratio
Bmax/T =
3,00
WL beam/Body draught
Bwl/Tc =
2,88
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
424,29
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
4,77
SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)
SA/HP =
0,23
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
2,41
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
9,65
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
6,50
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,67
Best motoring speed (1.1)
CSPD =
7,92
Kn
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,31
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
88,94



November 26, 2010
From João Antunes, in Portugal:
Dear Guillermo,
I placed my eyes on a Atlantic Clipper, design by Maurice Griffiths and it´s considered, by many brokers as a motor sailer.
Not many of these boats were built, only about 54 ( http://www.eventides.org.uk/Barbican.htm ) and maybe for that reason information is scarse, and aesthecics speaking they´re not very popular.
My questions are, Guillermo, would you consider this model a motor sailer?
And what is your opinion about this sailboat offshore capabilities? As far that i learned in my research, at least a couple of them ( 2) crossed the atlantic other, based in england use to cross the channel.
One last word of gratitude for you to keep this wonderfull website, where i some many times come to visit to gather information and knowledge.
João Antunes,
Lisboa - Portugal


Answer to João:
Caro João,
Sorry for the delay in answering, but I've been out of town.
I think we should not consider the Atlantic Clipper as a motorsailer even if its Power/Displacement ratio is a high one, because the hull was conceived for a sailing boat, so probably the prismatic coeficent is optimized for sailing, not for motoring or motorsailing. On top of that, to my taste, a proper motorsailer should perform an enclosed wheelhouse or at least a dog-house.
I do not know about her offshore sailing capabilities. The central cockpit and reserve of buoyancy over deck (if structurally sound) probably offer an increased level of safety.
Thank you very much for your kind words about my humble web site.
If you agree I would like to post your message and my answer there.
Melhores cumprimentos.
Guillermo.



June 01, 2010
From  Conrad Myers, proud owner of the 38 ft Fifer "New Seeker"
Hello Guillermo:
I stumbled on your interesting site. You don’t have a picture of a Fifer (Note from Guillermo: there is one under the "M" letter. Conrad realized later). These were built by James N Miller & Sons of St. Monance Fife Scotland between the late 50’s and 1978 when the yard went out of business. They ranged in size from 27 feet to 60 feet but most commonly 31 or 34 footers.
We own a 38 ft Fifer, “New Seeker”, launched in 1971 which we have had in our family since 1975 and was shipped from the UK to the USA when my parents emigrated there in 1980.
New Seeker is Iroko on sawn oak, 20 tons in weight with twin Perkins 4-236 M diesels (original) and she is a fantastic sea boat. Based now in Portland, Oregon USA where we live, we sail her every year up to British Columbia, Canada.  
It is my belief that the Banjers and Fishers got their idea of a fish boat type motor sailor from the Miller Fifer.  Johnathan Raban, the noted British author owned a fifer (a don’t recall the name) in which he circumnavigated the British isles and wrote a book about his experience called “coasting”
I’ll attach a photograph and can supply some more detail and more photos later. I have original builder brochures, build and launching photos and other materials that would be of interest

Best regards
Conrad Myers



April 19, 2010
From Tom Peranteau, new owner of the HARSTAD 31 shown at the Monohulls page.
Guillermo,
I wanted to give you an update for your Monohulls page on your website.  The entry for the Harstad 31 has a broken link.  The old link used to go to Ben Durham's site when he owned a Harstad, but his boat has since been sold to another person whom sold it to me.  I have put together a site that I am gathering information on for the Harstad 31.  If you would care to redirect the link to my site, it would be great.  My site is http://harstad31.coolblogsite.org
Thanks!
Tom Peranteau


April 17, 2010
From Dave Gervas, in Australia:

Dear Guillermo,
I really like your exhaustive collection of motor sailers. I have
attached a few snaps of my little Plymouth Pilot 18. These are
usually a forward cuddy type of fishing boat with engine only.
Mine is the weekender with a sailing rig. The engine is a Volvo 2002
18hp diesel. I really like my motor sailer and your boat "Marie"
looks like a beauty too. Here is a link to a famous old style of motor sailer
made by Lacco in Melbourne. http://www.sundanceyachts.com.au/used-yacht-52.php
Out of production by so sweet!
Kind regard
Dave Gervas
Gervas Design
Apartment 2
Level 2
28 Ord St
PO Box 274
West Perth
WA 6872
P: 08 9481 0106
F: 08 9226 2922
M: 0403 180 724
gervasdesign@iinet.net.au

 


Dec 07, 2009
Copenhaguen summit on Climate Change, day 0.
Just for the sake of freedom of opinion.
I'll post here whatever dissenting or agreeing (but always respectful) voices, but I suggest to rather express your opinion at:
http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/open-discussion/what-do-we-think-about-climate-change-21390.html
Guillermo.

"Ubi dubium ibi libertas"
(About one hour and a quarter long)


November 16, 2009
From Daniel van Velzen, owner of IP24 "IPPY"
Dear Sir,
My name is Daniel van Velzen, retired merchand-marine and rotating-equipment engineer and also webmaster of MY IP.  ( in the Netherlands)
Of course very fond of and impressed by your website. At one of the pages in mono hulls a picture of an IP24 with hyperlinks is shown.
"IJsvogel"
IP 24
Label: H 15/11+ (Bowsprit)
Design: Bill Waight
Due to problems with our provider, (they were overtaken), we had to move our site to another adress.
So our  sitelink  http//:www.my-ip24.nl  and the url  http://home.hetnet.nl/~dflvanvelzen  or http://home.kpn.nl/dflvanvelzen will not work anymore within about 6 weeks.
We kindly request you to change the url's on this IP24 picture on your website to the new url's.
The new url for the website of MY IP is  http://www.myip24.nl and is already working.
The new url for an article of designer Bill Waight is  http://www.myip24.nl/newsX_bestanden/IP%2024%20Article_r.gif
Thanks in advance and best regards,
Daniel van Velzen
Owner of IP24  "IPPY"
   


August 13, 2009
More from Rob:
Hello Guillermo Gefaell,
With the help of your web site and some further searching I was able to find out the Model and Manufacturer of the motorcruiser in question;  It is a Spurt 25 built by Mulder and Rijke.
Once again, thank you.
Rob Murray (Halifax, Ontario)


August 01, 2009
Rob Murray in Halifax, Canada, needs some help:
I m considering purchasing the attached motorcruiser, however the seller does not know the manufacturer and model.  
Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.


Can someone be of help? Write Rob at:  murlin<at>eastlink<dot>ca


August 01, 2009
This form was submitted:  Jul 30 2009 / 10:11:23

Yourname = Ric Martini
email = (deleted)
boatname = Kaloa
makemodel = Diesel Duck
hulllength = 44'
waterlinelength = 41'
beammaximum = 14'6"
waterlinebeam = 13'
keel = 5'6" full
bodydraught = 5'
displacement = 66,000#
ballast = sheer construction weight
sailarea =
mastheight =
stix =
hp = 152
experience = 45
use = coastal/offshore Pacific NW
comments = Trying to design a get-home rig, balanced instead of aft stabilizing as per design.  I am thinking of a mast height of ~32'set just forward of the hatch on the wheelhouse overhead and sail area of 480 sqft.  It isn't easy to get solid references, or to know what will look right. Stability checks on a similar boat in Pt. Townsend indicate that she will be self-righting and very stiff.


 

Additional photos are at the Ducktalk website, http://ducktalk.net/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/4921093711/m/13710306
Regards,
Ric


February 14, 2009
Several weeks ago I received theis message from João Antunes.
Yourname = Joao Antunes
makemodel = neptunian 33
hulllength = 9,98m
waterlinelength = 7,62m
beammaximum = 3.05m
ballast = 2,743Kg

Well, this was very little info on the boat, but searching internet, taking measurements from images here and there, and doing some guessing, I've come to the following:

Ketch version
Lh  =
9,98
m
Lwl  =
7,62
m
Bmax  =
3,05
m
Bwl  =
2,75
m
Draught T  =
1,38
m
Body draught Tc  =
0,89
m
Moulded depth  H =
1,79
m
Disp  =
6200
kg
Ballast  =
2743
kg
Sail area  =
38,3
m2
Mast height =
11,2
m
Heeling Arm =
5,03
m
Power  =
33,09
KW

Length/Beam Ratio
(2Lwl + Lh)/3B =
2,76
Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
2,78
Length/Draught Ratio
Lh/T =
7,23
Beam/Draught Ratio
Bmax/T =
2,21
WL beam/Body draught
Bwl/Tc =
3,08
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,44
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
390,85
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
11,53
Sail Area/Wetted surface
SA/WS =
1,67
SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)
SA/HP =
0,85
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
3,29
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
6,70
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
6,46
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,96
Best motoring speed (1.1)
CSPD =
5,50
Kn
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,68
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
35,72
Roll Period
T  =
3,47
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,06
G's
Stability Index
SI =
1,27
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
117
º         
Dellenbaugh Angle
DA =
18
º  (14 kn wind)     



February 04, 2009
Viksund 31 Goldfish, MS-33. Looking for more owners.
Greetings. I'm trying to locate more owners of the Viksund series of sailboats here in the U.S. Bjarne Eikevik of Ft. Lauderdale Florida imported a number of these as well as the 27 Columbi between 1972-1980. A website has been created for owners www.viksund-ms.com which is still pretty rough but there is a forum as well. It's not my intention to pull forum members away but Earling Viksund may be heading to Nova Scotia to sail Magnus down to the Caribbean. If would be fantastic to get other owners together and take part in the passage. I look forward to finding more Viksunds out there!
Luke
Viksund33<at>gmail<dot>com


December 17, 2008
From Brian Eiland
Saw this posting over on another forum....Can you help with ID of this vessel??
http://www.yachtforums.com/forums/general-sailing-discussion/10290-help-identifying-motorsailor.html



October 28, 2008
From Pedro Serra, in Portugal
Hi!

Do you know this one?
I can send you more details.
She is a fat , old, ugly lady, but sails like a normal sail yacht even to windard.
best regards from sunny Portugal
Pedro

 

See the especial page we created for this boat. Click HERE



October 07, 2008
From Paul Schlechter:

Hello Guillermo,

Mike Euritt of a 37' Banjer motorsailer suggested I get in touch with you. I am the new owner of the Monterey Clipper "Tortuga" of which you have the original brochure posted in the monohull section of your Motorsailers and Motorsailing site. I am including a couple of current photos for you, unfortunately without the mast in place
..........................
Regards,
Paul Schlechter
31' Cheoy Lee Monterey Clipper Troller "Tortuga"

 



October 07, 2008
From Ben Eckensweiler
Hi, please find attached an updated photo for the PCF 40, Bruce Roberts
design. This is a picture of "OLD ROSIE" located on Georgian Bay in Ontario, Canada.
Thanks for the great site!!
Ben



October 03, 2008
From Larry Zeitlin, on the Willard Vega Horizon

boatname = Puffin
makemodel = Willard Horizon
hulllength = 30'
waterlinelength = 27.5'
beammaximum = 10.5'
waterlinebeam = 10'
keel = 3.5' full length keel
bodydraught = 2'
displacement = 15,000 lb. cruising load (half load)
ballast = 4000 lb.
sailarea = 280 sq. ft.
mastheight = 32'
stix = NA
hp = 36 hp @ 3000 rpm
experience = 65+
use = Coastal long passages, moderate ocean cruising
comments = The Willard Horizon is a very strongly constructed pilothouse motorsailer loosely based on a Colin Archer hull design. It has a high bow, canoe stern and a modest cutter rigged sail plan. It has a very easily driven modified sailing hull with a .48 prismatic coefficient. Long cruises are best accomplished under sail and motor operating together. When motorsailing the fuel consumption is less than .5 US gallon per hour giving a range of over 1000 NM with on board tankage. The low fuel consumption and simple mechanicals make the boat ideal for long passages to relatively unpopulated areas such as Alaska's Inland Passage.

The hull was in production, virtually unchanged, from 1973 to 1997 and was adapted for cruising sailboats, motorsailers, recreational trawlers, and fishing boats by changing the top molding and mechanical components. The Willard line was often called the "Pocket Battleship" of small trawlers.

The Willard Horizon is self righting to 122 degrees. I can partially verify this since the boat and I survived a 90 degree knockdown during a microburst.


Numbers for the WILLARD HORIZON 30 with such data, as per my calculator:
Guillermo.

Length/Beam Ratio
(2Lwl + Lh)/3B =
2,30
Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
2,90
Length/Draught Ratio
Lh/T =
10,60
Beam/Draught Ratio
Bmax/T =
4,32
WL beam/Body draught
Bwl/Tc =
3,32
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,27
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
274,48
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
7,36
Sail Area/Wetted surface
SA/WS =
1,03
(estimated)
SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)
SA/HP =
0,72
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
2,40
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
7,22
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
5,97
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,83
Best motoring speed (1.1)
CSPD =
5,92
Kn
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
2,11
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
25,18
Heft  Ratio
HF =
0,86
Roll Period
T  =
2,98
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,12
G's
Stability Index
SI =
0,98
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
112
º         

Estimated STIX:
For 112º AVS = 28
For 122º AVS = 33


HISTORY OF THE WILLARD VEGA 30

The Willard Vega 30 was produced from 1972 to 1975. During those four short years, an incredible 110 Vega 30s were pulled form Willard molds. Willard Marine produced more of this model than any other. This model was built in four different versions, Nomad, Voyager, Horizon, and Searcher. Today, a Vega 30 in good condition is said to worth twice what it cost new.
The Horizon version is a 'motorsailer' with low profile superstructure. There were 28 Horizon built.
The Nomad version is a 'sedan' style with flybridge above on the boat deck. 29 of this version were built.
The Voyager is a raised 'pilothouse' style with a full width saloon aft of the pilothouse. There were 29 of this version built.
The Searcher is a 'fishboat' style with pilothouse and flybridge directly above the pilothouse. A total of 20 hulls were built.
In addition, 2 hulls were produced and sold as 'hull only'.
(From: http://www.ads-promo.com/willard.html)


August 15, 2008
Here some aditional contributions:
By J. Conlon on a wooden motorsailer:

Hull Length: 44' to 48' OAL wood hull
Use: Coastal
Comments: One of the prettiest and I believe most able motorsailors I have seen was a vessel by the name of SUNQUEST. She was summer berthed at Wickford Shipyard, 125 Steamboat Ave, North Kingstown, RI 02852 (401-294-3361) for many years from the middle 1950's through the mid 1960's.
As I recall she was a design of a well known naval archtecht of that era. (I cannot recall who however.)

This vessel was home based in Benton Harbor, Michigan, but summered in Rhode Island. The boat also sailed all through the Caribiean and up and down the east coast of the US. If you can locate photos and other data, this vessel is a modern classic. I wish I had more information for you, bur this may be a start.



By Dan Chapman, on the Fairey Fisherman:

Hull Length: 27' 5"
Waterline Length: 25'
Beam (Maximum): 8' 9"
Keel Draught: 2' 3" Yes it is very shallow draft
Displacement: 5500# half way twixt light & loaded
Ballast: 1000#
Sail Area: 260 total main & jib
Engines HP: Perkins 108 40 HP (Very old boat @60'-70's
Comments: English boat capable of heavy weather and can take the ground at  low tide. Coastal use with a SA/D of 13



June 5, 2008
From friend Pierre Houin, a regular contributor.
hi guillermo
you can have a look at this one
http://www.saillard-guy.com/index.php?page=moteur&gamme=oc&oc=oc53

Guy Gallard's Ocean Cruiser 53.6

i join you a doc about a trawler catamaran sail assisted
see you

The document Pierre refers to is a pdf on the Bamba 50, a very nice sail assisted trawler catamaran from Joubert/Nivelt.
Link to such document:
http://pagesperso-orange.fr/yacht-concept/fiches%20pdf/Fiche%20de%20presentation%20BAMBA%2050%20A.pdf

Bamba 50


May 31, 2008
Friend Troy Parrot, in the USA, told me about the RAWSON 30
She was designed by William Garden, originally as an open cockpit sailing boat, but later a pilothouse (not wheelhouse) was added.
There is a wealth of info on the Rawson 30 at: http://www.rawson30.com/


Here some numbers for her:

Lh  =
9,29
m
30,48
Ft
Lwl  =
6,70
m
21,98
Ft
Bmax  =
2,74
m
8,99
Ft
Bwl  =
2,47
m
8,10
Ft
Draught T  =
1,52
m
4,99
Ft
Body draught Tc  =
0,82
m
2,69
Ft
Moulded depth  H =
2,20
m
7,22
Ft
Disp  =
5439
kg
12000,61
lbs
Ballast  =
2266
kg
4999,70
lbs
Sail area  =
38,1
m2
410,10
Ft2
Mast height =
12,58
m
41,27
Ft
Heeling Arm =
5,64
m
18,50
Ft
Power  =
22,5
KW
30,6
HP

Length/Beam Ratio
(2Lwl + Lh)/3B =
2,76
Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
2,71
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,42
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
504,40
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
12,52
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
2,55
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
6,28
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,99
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,57
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
40,27
Roll Period
T  =
3,87
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,04
G's
Stability Index
SI =
1,57
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
155
º         

Very nice figures, indicating a cruising sailboat with blue water abilities, safe and with a comfortable behaviour. Although somewhat sail-underpowered by today's standards (SA/D ratio only 12.52), that will make life easier for the crew when wind freshens up.


May 31, 2008
Hi again Guilermo,
Having now spent far too much time just scratching the surface of your excellent website I notice the very recent post from Eammon McGratton regarding his mystery ship. Whilst I'm pretty sure that this vessel is not a Pugh, Eammon may be interested to research such vessels designed by John Pugh in Australia. Many of his vessels were steel and owner/builder construction. Some of his fore and aft cabin motor sailers were very pretty and similar to the mystery boat pictured.
Best regards
Steve Campbell
Perth, Western Australia

Note from Guillermo: I have not been able to find a web site or other contact means for John Pugh. Anybody knows?

May 30, 2008
From Steve Campbell, in Australia
(He first sent a set of pictures on "Nocturne", an SCUFFY 27)
Guilermo hi again,
Not sure what I can add more but I have a rough spec sheet and some written promotional text from the manufacturer. Please let me know if there is anything more specific that you would like. This vessel is moored in Kettering, Tasmania which is about an hour south of Hobart although it originated in Sydney, New South Wales.
Dual controls obviously and this one theoretically a bit overpowered with a Sole SM636 at 36-40hp (Mercedes OM636) most were apparently fitted with around 15-20hp alternatives and still reach hull speed. This one is good for uphill legs.
Apparently there are several more in Tasmania and presumably the East coast of Australia as well. I haven't come across any others as yet.
Best regards
Steve Campbell


Here some numbers for Nocturne:

Lh  =
8,23
m
27,00
Ft
Lwl  =
7,01
m
23,00
Ft
Bmax  =
3,12
m
10,24
Ft
Bwl  =
2,81
m
9,22
Ft
Draught T  =
0,99
m
3,25
Ft
Body draught Tc  =
0,56
m
1,84
Ft
Moulded depth  H =
1,70
m
5,58
Ft
Disp  =
3172
kg
6998,70
lbs
Ballast  =
906
kg
1999,00
lbs
Sail area  =
26,01
m2
279,97
Ft2
Mast height =
10,7
m
35,10
Ft
Heeling Arm =
4,68
m
15,34
Ft
Power  =
26,47
KW
36,00
HP

Length/Beam Ratio
(2Lwl + Lh)/3B =
2,38
Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
2,49
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,29
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
256,84
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
12,24
SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)
SA/HP =
0,72
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
5,14
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
6,43
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
1,00
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
2,14
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
20,02
Roll Period
T  =
1,95
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,20
G's
Stability Index
SI =
0,69
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
119
º         




May 28, 2008
From Eamon McGrattan:
Could you help me identify the type and designer of this boat ?
I saw her in Tunis, Tunisia in October ’07. There was a ( retired ? ) couple aboard but I didn’t get to talk to them.
She appeared to be made of steel. I consider her a motorsailor due to the high bow and the pilot house.
I am now 42 years old, and before 50, hope to have a similar boat. Retire at 55-ish and live-aboard / cruise.
Due to future energy /enviromental concerns, sailing ability is important but I want the option to drop the mast and travel through the French canals to the Med and so need motor.
I’ve looked at Bruce Roberts PCF but feel it would not have any sailing ability in light winds.
Regards,
Eamon
(If anybody can help, please write Eamon at:   Eamon<at>mcgk<dot>ie)

 



May 10, 2008
From the Claymore Motorsailers Owners Group:

We'd be very pleased if you would add our Claymore Motorsailers web to
your group:
http://www.eastcoasthorizon.com/Claymore/index.htm
Olivebank

I've gladly done that. I think it's also interesting to reproduce here this info from their site:

"The Claymore Motorsailer class vessel was originally built at J.Samuel White's shipyard in Cowes, UK, founded in 1881. White's shipyard customarily built very large vessels. Some great pictures of the shipyard are posted on this website: http://www.invectis.co.uk/iow/gg_is.htm. Claymore's Designer was Alan F. Hill. Claymores were built from the period approx. 1970-1980. Builder: Marine Construction, Ltd. (Marcon), England.The following are the basic construction dimensions as listed in the builders sales brochure: L.O.A. 30', Water line. 24', Beam. 10', Draft. 4' 1", Full Keel, 2-1/2 tons ballast, Displacement. 6.3 tons, Thames Tonnage. 11, Designed sail area for the Ketch rig: Main/Mizzen/Genoa, 466 sq. ft. (43.1 sq. m.)., Designed sail area for the Sloop rig: Main/Genoa, 460 sq. ft. (42.6 sq. m.)."

I'll work these numbers in a while and post results here.
Guillermo.


 March 15, 2008
From friend Dave Herndon:

First Eastern FOG Rendezvous
Where: Dymer Creek, Virginia (off the western Virginia shore of the Chesapeake Bay)
Latitude: 37º 40.8' N; Longitude: 076º 22.0' W
When: Friday, Saturday, and Sunday (June 27, 28, and 29)

Start your planning now and put these dates on your calendar

Details: Dave Herndon (Wayward Wind, F25) and Dick Seymann (Tantalus, F30) will host the first Eastern Fisher Owners Group (FOG) Rendezvous at the home pier of Dave Herndon in Dymer Creek (White Stone, VA) during the last weekend in June 08.  The location is on Virginia's Historic Northern Neck (the peninsula surrounded by the Potomac River, the Chesapeake Bay, and the Rappahannock River).  This location is, by water, approximately 40 nm north of Hampton Roads and 80 nm south of Annapolis.  Dave has a very protected, deepwater (7') pier that can handle up to four Fishers (more with rafting off the end of the pier).  Limited 20 amp and 30 amp pier connections are available.  Dave's immediate neighbor's pier (100' to the north) can handle two additional Fishers (more with rafting off the end of the pier).  For those who prefer anchoring, there is plenty of good anchorage in front of Dave's house and Dave's pier also has a low-level dinghy dock. The bottom line is that we can handle all the Fishers that desire to attend.  Fisher owners who desire to arrive earlier or leave later (for logistics or weather reasons) are invited to keep their Fishers at Dave's pier for as long as they like.  Local Navigation Information: Tidal Range 1.5 ft.; Tidal Current less than 0.7 knots; Chart Magnetic Variation 11°W.  

Rendezvous Event Schedule (Tentative)
Friday June 27:
08:00-17:00 Fisher Arrivals and Boat Reviews/Photos
17:00 Cocktails on pier and/or at Dave's house
18:00 Pot luck dinner on pier (we can order food in if desired)
Saturday June 28:
08:00-13:00 Fisher Arrivals and Boat Reviews/Photos
12:00 Steamed Crab, Hamburger, Hot Dog Feast on pier and/or Dave's yard and screen porch
13:00 -16:00 Fisher Sailing Regatta and Photographs, Dymer Creek and Fleets Bay area
17:00 Cocktails on pier and/or Dave's house
18:00 Dinner out (restaurant TBD).  Dave and Dick will provide auto transportation as needed
Sunday June 29
08:00 Breakfast on the Pier
09:00 Final Meeting and Photo ops
10:00 Leave for sail on Chesapeake Bay and to head back home

Directions for those arriving by water
From points south (Rappahannock River, etc.) to the entrance to Dymer Creek (off Fleets Bay)
From Windmill Point light (marking the north entrance cape of the Rappahannock River) to North Point Light “N”: Course 318T; 4.6 nm.
From North Point Light “N” to Dymer Creek Entrance Light “2”:  Course 277T; 0.9 nm, (From Dymer Creek “2” to Dave's Home see Dymer Creek Directions below)
From points north (Potomac River, etc.)  to the entrance to Dymer Creek (off Fleets Bay)
From Smith Point Light (marking the south entrance cape of the Potomac River) to Bluff Point light “B”: Course 200T, 13.1 nm
From Bluff Point Light “B” to Dymer Creek Light “2”: Course 240T; 2.3 nm. (From Dymer Creek “2” to Dave's Home see Dymer Creek Directions below)
From Dymer Creek “2” to Dave Herndon's Home (about 2.8 nm):  
Follow the four entrance channel lights (“2”, “4”, “6”, and “7”) into Dymer Creek.  From Dymer Creek Light “7” it's about 2.0 nm to Dave's pier.  Dymer Creek ranges from 20-7 feet deep all the way to Dave's pier.  
From Dymer Creek Light “7” head northwest (approximate course 293T).  Keep in the middle.  About one nm in, keep the abandoned duck blind ruins with an osprey nest to your starboard side (the north side of the deep channel goes right up to the old duck blind ruins.  A little further on you will see an osprey nest pole on the port side of the creek. Keep this nest pole to your port (the south side of the deep channel goes right up to this nest pole.)
When you approach the large white home straight ahead, there is about three quarters nm left to go.  The creek bends to the right, then to the left, then to the right, and then back to the left.  Just keep in the middle and well away from the points.  
When you see directly in front of you (from left to right): a white boathouse, a large yellow ranch house, a two-story gray house with a white fence on the right, and a two story yellow house with a flag pole, you have arrived.  Dave's house is the middle one (the two-story gray house).  You will see Dave's Fisher 25, Wayward Wind (green hull, tanbark sails) on the north side of his pier.
Dave's geographical pier position is approximately: Latitude: 37º 40.8' N; Longitude: 076º 22.0' W

Directions for those arriving by land
Dave's home is located just off state route 3, half way between the villages of White Stone and Kilmarnock, VA.  Dave's home is about 1.5 hours from Richmond Airport; 1.5 hours from Newport News-Williamsburg Airport; 2.5 hours from Norfolk Airport; 3.0 hours from Washington Reagan Airport; and 3.5 hours from Washington Dulles Airport.  There is also a small general airport (Hummel Field - no commercial flights) in Topping, VA (10 minutes from Dave's home).  There is no public transportation to this rural area.  Individuals flying in will require a rental car.  There are several lodging facilities (inexpensive to luxury) within 10 minutes of Dave's home (see below).
From Kilmarnock, VA
From the traffic light at the corner of Main Street and Irvington Road (the last traffic light heading east), go east on state route 3 (toward White Stone) for 2.2 miles to Long Lane Farm
Turn left onto Long Lane Farm (a paved private drive with large pecan trees on both sides) and go to the end of the lane (about 0.5 miles)
Dave Herndon's home is the last driveway on the left (see sign, Herndon, 469)
From White Stone, VA
From White Stone's one and only traffic light, go west on state route 3 (toward Kilmarnock) for 2.2 miles to Long Lane Farm
Turn right onto Long Lane Farm (a paved private drive with large pecan trees on both sides) and go to the end of the lane (about 0.5 miles)
Dave Herndon's home is the last driveway on the left (see sign, Herndon, 469)

Local Hotel, Motel, and B&B Lodgings (If you require local lodgings, make reservations early as during the boating season, these lodging are usually filled)
Back Inn Time (B&B), Kilmarnock, VA (804) 435-2318 (10 minutes from Dave's home. $$)
Flowering Fields B&B, Kilmarnock, VA (804) 435-6238 (just across the creek from Dave's pier; 5 minutes from Dave's by car or dinghy. $$$)
Holiday Inn Express, Kilmarnock, VA (804) 436-1500 (10 minutes from Dave's home. $$)
Hope and Glory Inn (B&B), Irvington, VA (804) 438-6053 (National award-winning B&B; 10 minutes from Dave's home. $$$)
Pilot House Inn (motel), Topping, VA (804) 758-2262 (10 minutes from Dave's home. $)
Tides Inn (Luxury Resort Hotel), Irvington, VA (804) 438-4433 (10 minutes from Dave's home. $$$$)
Whispering Pines Motel, White Stone, VA (804) 435-1101 (5 minutes from Dave's home. $)

Contact Information
Dave Herndon's Address and Contact Information: 469 Long Lane Farm, White Stone, VA 22578; Home Phone: (804) 435-2056; Cell Phone: (804) 761-0409; Email: dhherndon@aol.com
Dick Seymann's Address and Contact Information: 771 Townley Farm Road, White Stone, VA 22578; Home Phone: (804) 436-1214; Email: seymann@townleyfarm.net

Please let us know ASAP if you plan to attend



Dec 22, 2007
Hello Guillermo!

Thanks for your collection of fine motorsailors.
I spend quite some time exploring the links :-)

However there is one design I like a lot which is still missing:
Cromarty 36
data at cromarty36.com
Nice compact ketch with interesting afterdeck / rear cabin solution.
Could you try to give some classification in your system?
My try did not work properly: (VH 9/38).
From my knowledge of sailboat comparisons there should be a square are cubic relation in some of the ratios...

with best regards,
Jan
Hello Jan!
Thanks a lot for the sending of info on the Cromarty 36!
I got a labeling of VH 15 / 17 for her, which indicates her to be within what I consider a nice motorsiler concept, although somewhat heavy by nowadays tendencies.
Down here you'll find some additional numbers for her.
All the best.
Guillermo.

INPUT:
Lh =
11,00
m
Lwl =
8,13
m
Bmax =
3,66
m
Bwl =
3,29
m
Draught T =
1,41
m
Body draught Tc =
0,73
m (guess)
Disp =
8636
kg
Ballast =
3048
kg
Sail area =
64,11
m2
Mast height =
14,67
m
Heeling Arm =
6,43
m (guess)
Power =
40,44
KW

OUTPUT
Length/Beam Ratio


(2Lwl + Lh)/3B =
2,48


Lwl/Bwl Ratio


Lwl/Bwl =
2,47


Length/Draught Ratio


Lh/T =
7,8


Beam/Draught Ratio


Bmax/T =
2,6


WL beam/Body draught


Bwl/Tc =
4,51


Ballast/Disp Ratio


W/Disp =
0,35


Displacement/Length Ratio


D/L =
448,25


Sail Area/Disp. Ratio


SA/D =
15,48


Sail Area/Wetted surface


SA/WS =
2,14


SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)


SA/HP =
1,17


Power/ Disp. Ratio


HP/D =
2,89
HP/ton
Hull speed


HSPD =
6,92
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed


PMS =
7,29
Kn
Velocity Ratio


VR =
1,05


Best motoring speed (1.1)


CSPD =
5,68
Kn
Capsize Safety Factor


CSF =
1,8


Motion Comfort Ratio


MCR =
36,14


Moment of Inertia


I =
820514,41
Lb/ft2
Roll Period


T =
3,93
Sec
Roll Acceleration


Acc =
0,06
G's
Stability Index


SI =
1,07


Angle of Vanishing Stability


AVS =
122º



Nov 24, 2007
E-mail information lost.
Yesterday I made an stupid mistake and lost all my inbox messages. As I had some unanswered ones, I ask the senders to forward such messages to me again.
I apologize for the inconveniences.
Fair winds to all of you!
Guillermo.

Oct 21, 2007
Doug & Anne S. sent this info and images on their boat "DRAKUS"

Boat Make Model: Ed Monk / Skookum Marine
Hull Length: 47'
Waterline Length: ?
Beam (Maximum): 13'2"
Beam WL: ?
Keel Draught: 6'8"
Body Draugth amidships: 6'4"
Displacement: ~22 tons
Ballast: ?
Sail Area: ?
Heeeling Arm: ?
Engines HP: 82
Comments: Have a couple of pages from Ed Monk Sr's plans. Ed Monk Jr. may have more in his old files. The boat may have come from lines of a wooden sailing boat by Ed Monk

 

(With this little info I cannot work out numers for DRAKO. I hope Doug and Anne are able to get and send me all necessary info.)


Oct 11, 2007
Hugh Geen sends a couple of links:
I am not an expert on this topic, but:
http://nautisme.lemonde.fr/scripts/consult/annonce/detail.asp?M=RUB&RU=VT&NP=1&TP=1&AN=368201&noPage=3
http://nautisme.lemonde.fr/scripts/consult/annonce/detail.asp?M=BAT&RU=VT&NB=Ketch+Aurique+MOTOR+SAILOR&AN=368220&NP=1&TP=1&noPage=1
Regards,


I think the Saudade is not a motorsailer, but a nice looking classic sailing boat.  On the other hand the Aurique seems to be rather a sail assisted motor boat.
Guillermo.


Sept 28, 2007
Ray Henry sends info on his boat, SEAWEED.
He did an extensive and outstanding complete boat refit.

Boat Make & Model: Nimble Kodiak Yawl
Hull Length: 26'6"
Waterline Length: 24'3"
Beam (Maximum): 8'6"
Total Draught: 2'10"
Body Draugth amidships: 12"
Displacement: 4000
Ballast:
Sail Area: 285
Engines HP: 18 SAE.  Don't know DIN or SAE hp. Engine is a Yanmar 2GM20F.
Comments: Published mfgr. DISP numbers were notoriously underestimated.
I have a website at http://seaweed.thebilge.com


Some estimated numbers for SEAWEED:
(4000 lb displacement, 1350 lb ballast)
Length/Beam Ratio
L/B =
2,93
Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
3,16
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,34
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
124,79
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
18,11
Sail Area/Wetted surface
SA/WS =
1,9
SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)
SA/HP =
1,47
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
4,52
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
6,60
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
7,65
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
1,16
Best motoring speed (1.1)
CSPD =
5,42
Kn
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
2,15
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
14,14
Heft  Ratio
HF =
0,65
Roll Period
T  =
1,76
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,19
G's
Stability Index
SI =
0,68
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
118
º


August 11, 2007

Hej
Fell over your site by accident, searching for info on an old motorsailer.
I have owned LM 24 & LM 27.
GREAT SITE WELL DONE!
Kind regards Tony Denmark

Thanks a lot for your kind words, Tony!


July 21, 2007
From A. Trometer
Boat's name: The Laughing Turtle
Boat Make Model: Schucker 436
Hull Length: 39' 6"
Waterline Length: 33'
Beam (Maximum): 14'
Total Draught: 3'" 2"
Body Draugth amidships: 2' 10"
Displacement: 22000 #s
Ballast: 6000 #s
Sail Area: 545 Sq Ft (Cutter)
Engines HP: 51 HP Perkins @4000 RPM
Comments: Can you calculate all your interesting numbers from this or do you need more info?

Dear August,
Here some numbers for you.
Cheers.
Length/Beam Ratio
L/B =
2,5


Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
2,62


Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,27


Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
273,28


Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
11,18


Sail Area/Wetted surface
SA/WS =
1,46


SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)
SA/HP =
1


Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
2,32
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
7,70
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
7,25
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,94


Best motoring speed (S/V=1.1)
BSPD =
6,32
Kn
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
2


Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
28,68


Heft Ratio
HF =
0,89


Righting Moment/Beam
RMB =
0,76


Roll Period
T =
3,18
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,12
G's
Stability Index
SI =
0,74


Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
117
º




May 13, 2007
From Pierre Houin
Hi
here is Atoa 64 motorsailer by Morozov Yachts
http://www.atoa64.com/
bye


May 6, 2007
Here some estimated numbers for Joe's  Cheoy Lee 63:

Length/Beam Ratio
L/B =
3,08
Lwl/Bwl Ratio
Lwl/Bwl =
3,25
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,3
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
276,74
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
11,00
Sail Area/Wetted surface
SA/WS =
1,68
SA (metric)/ Power (Imp.)
SA/HP =
0,32
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
4,26
Hull speed
HSPD =
9,86
Potential Maximum Speed (Sail)
PMS =
8,85
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,9
Best motoring speed (1.1)
CSPD =
8,1
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,6
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
54,43
Heft  Ratio
HF =
1,42
Roll Period
T  =
6,04
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,05
Stability Index
SI =
1,07


April 22, 2007
From Joe Quinn (some days ago)

Boat Make Model: Cheoy Lee 63
Hull Length: 63' 4"
Waterline Length: 54' 2"
Beam (Maximum): 18' 6"
Total Draught: 6' 6"
Body Draugth amidships: ?
Displacement: 98,500lbs
Ballast: 30,000lbs
Sail Area: 1,466
Engines HP: 2 X 210hp
Comments: I'm not sure what you mean by "Body draught amidships" nor do I know whether the engine power is din or sae.
Original brochure photos at http://www.cheoyleeassociation.com/motorsail63.htm
Thanks and best regards,
Joe


April 08, 2007
From  Lyle Anderson

Suggested LinkBook: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/schuckerboats/
Comments: This is the official Schucker Motorsailor user group and web site.


March 31, 2007
From Mitchell Phillips, in Australia

Boat's name: No Name yet
Boat Make Model: Brewer Alaska
Hull Length: 43
Waterline Length: 38
Beam (Maximum): 4.0m
Total Draught: 5ft 6inches
Body Draugth amidships:
Displacement: 16tonnes
Ballast: 4.5 to 5 tonnes
Sail Area: 1043 ft
Engines HP: 67hp

Comments: Hi I am building a Brewer Alaska and have a blog your readers may be interested in looking at. http://mitchboat.blogspot.com/
It would be nice if you posted this as a link. I found your web site several years ago and found it was a good reference. Especially the way you have posted so many designs in one place with designers details etc. Extremely helpful. I also have a photo of a completed Alaska. I noticed you only have a drawing posted here. This was also an Australian boat which I looked at several months ago. The owners and their 3 kids had just completed a 3 year circumnavigation and had very positive reports on her crusing ability.
I'll email you the photo separately and keep up the good work with your web site.
Mitchell Phillips
Byron Bay
Australia
  

March 24, 2007
Dear friends,
Please let me introduce our range of motoryachts.
There are 2 Nomad 30 models we produce.  One is a motorsailor with mast and sails with Lombardini 40 HP diesel
Second is the same boat but motoryacht version with 40 HP Lombardini diesel
Specifications:
Overall length …… 9.30 m
Beam ……………..3.20 m
Draft ……………….1.45 m
Displacement …….3.8 tons
Ballast ………1.2 tons
Sail area ……45 sqm  Main sail (25 sqm) + Genoa (20 sqm)
CE type certificate B-C
We provide boats in following colours : deep green hull - pure white deck, oxford blue hull – white deck, black hul – ivory deck, burgundy hull – ivory deck, navy grey hull – pure white deck.
Boats are with or without deckhouse, with 2 or 3 cabins, accomodating up to 6 persons in style.
Regards,
Milos Suk (Turkey)
m.suk1@seznam.cz

 


March 14, 2007
From Bill Thompson, looking for info on the Norsea 26

Name: Bill Thompson
Email: norsea26<at>aol<dot>com    (Substitute <at> by "@" and <dot> by ".")
Boat's name: Halemai
Boat Make Model: Norsea 26 Pilothouse
Hull Length: 26ft
Waterline Length: 25
Beam (Maximum): 8
Total Draught: 4
Body Draugth amidships:
Displacement:
Ballast:
Sail Area:
Engines HP:
Comments: Trying to get more information. I haven't fround anyone else with this boat

If you can help, please e-mail Bill


March 01, 2007
From Jos van den Heuvel
Hello,
On your site there's a link under IP24 to an article of the designer of this boat.
This article is placed in the photodirtory of my site "IP24" which can be found under the following alias; http://boatex.wolweb.nl (although without www).
As my website is non commercial and pure as info for all owners and other interests it would be reat to refer to the homepage of the website.
I already get some traffic linked via your fine website during a long time and as far as I can see visitors edit the link in your site manually so they can get to the homepage.
In my website nearly all technical info about the IP can be found.
Enclosed a picture of "my IP24 named IJsvogel which is Dutch for Icebird.
For the good order,You're free by using the link and photo's for your use and publishing.
Awaiting your reply,
kind regards
Jos van den Heuvel




February 11, 2007
Some correspondence from  Peter McGrath

Hi Guillermo,
Great site - a friend has just bought a Viksund 25 - small and quite old but a lovely looking vessel. I'll send pics as soon as we go for out first sail.
...............(.a couple of days later)...........
OK: the owner says - 'pictures: not until I've painted the hull'.

For a story about the owner and the buying of the boat:
http://messingaboutinboats.typepad.com/sailing/

Regards,
Peter McGrath

The HMS Beagle Project • Celebrating Darwin • Inspiring science• Building evolution's inspiration.
web: www.thebeagleproject.com
blog: www.thebeagleproject.com/beagleblog.html



February 10,2007
From Staffan Söderhäll, in Sweden
Hola Guillermo!
Exploring your nice motorsailing site, I have some difficulties to make data för my Nauticat 38 to fit in. It might be the conversion from metric to imperial measures that makes the difference but it doesn't seem to be the problem. I can se that your boat is about the sama siza as ours (or may be closer to the Nc36). For ex., if I divide the displacement w/ the water line length (27000 pounds/30,8 ft) the ratio comes to 877. In comparison, the ratio should ba abt half that figure. Where is the error?
Have you made any calculations for the Nc38? I include some metric data:
LOA 11,80 m
LWL 9,25 m
Displacement 12000 kg (water and fuel included). The displacement from the yard says 11000 kg but I dont knox if the tanks are full or empty.
Beam: 3,40 m
BWL: 3,20 m
Sail area 70 sqm
Mast heigth 14,7 m
Motor 120 hp (oversized but nice)
Fixed 3 blade propeller
If you have som excess time, it would be nice to hear from you. Included is a pic of "Miss Ellie" Nc38 #19 built in 1976 at the summer mooring place in our beautiful Stockholm archipelago.
Keep up the good work!
Best regards
/Staffan Söderhäll
Stockholm, Sweden



Dear Staffan,
sorry for the long delay in answering, but I had my home computer out of work for several weeks, and now I'm updating little by little my e-mails and other tasks.
Guessing Nauticat 38's ballast as a 35% of the 11000 kg displacement (probably either the 'lightship' condition or  the CE's 'minimum operating condition' MOC),
 here some estimated numbers I get for her:

Length/Beam Ratio
L/B =
2,95
L/B floatation
Lfl/Bfl =
2,89
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,35
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
387,66
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
14,40
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
4,95
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
7,38
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
1,02
Recomm. cruising speed (SL ratio =1.1)
CSPD =
6,06
Kn
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,54
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
45,59
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
130
º         
Roll Period
T  =
4,13
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,05
G's
Stability Index
SI =
1,21
Initial Metacentric height
GMo =
0,42
m
Righting Arm 30º
RA30 =
0,18
m

Kindest regards.
Guillermo.


February 4, 2007
From Jan Keuvelaar, in Holland.
hello,
can you tell me what for kind boot this is?  what kind of brand, motor,....

extra info that i know:
8 m long 3 meter breeth and 1,1 deep,  the motor was "yanmar" 12pk

kind regard
jan keuvelaar
jankeuvelaar<at>hotmail<dot>com

Unknown boat. Anybody may help?
Write Jan and let me know. Thanks  in advance.


February 4, 2007
From Simon Haagsma, in Holland.
Dear sir,
I sent you a picture of a Danish Rose ms 31. I give you the suggestion to place it on your site.
Thank you.
Simon Haagsma
Holland

December 04, 2006
From Rick Burres
Dear sir, I have recently acquired a Rex 33, designed by George Stadel and built in 1964 by Hogdon Brothers Yachts. She is 33 ft. on deck, LWL ?, 11ft. on the beam, and has a 4 ft. draft. The displacement is unknown at this time. She was custom built and is one of a kind. Am researching her history and hope to know more soon. She needs some work but is in surprisingly good condition and I use her as much as I can. I worked in a boatyard for a few years and am now working on an engineering degree. I finally have a pilot house from which to steer, navigate, and sleep! Any info about my craft would come in handy. Anybody recognize her?
Regards, Rick Burres.
funfoto<at>wk<dot>net



November 06, 2006
From Richard Freedberg

Boat name: CHARLIE
Boat Make Model: Unterelbe Ketch
Hull Length: 10 meters
Waterline Length: 9 meters
Beam (Maximum): 310 meters
Total Draught: 1 meter
Body Draugth amidships: 1 meter
Displacement: 7,500 tons
Ballast: 3 tons
Sail Area: 43,39 square meter
Engines HP: 45
Comments: Charlie is a bilge keeler. You can read about her in Latitudes and Attitudes magazine.
Here is a photo of my motorsailer CHARLIE, now permanently moored in Greece after a wonderful 2 month sail from Amsterdam. I have sailed CHARLIE into Istanbul and she handled beautifully for an old 28 year old lady. It is interesting to tell that in a squall on the North Sea, the boat was knocked completely down on its side with a reefed mainsail and a single working jib, and she popped right up. I think the bilge keels were very important at that time.
She handles well in the short, choppy seas in the North Aegean, where the meltemi wind can blow up to a Beaufort 8 in a matter of minutes.



Here some estimated numbers for her (Guillermo)

Beam/Length Ratio
B/L =
3,06
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
40 %
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
286,96
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
11,51
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
2,72
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
7,28
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
6,97
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,96
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,6
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
37,86
Heft  Ratio
HF =
1,52
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
148
º    (Wow!)    
Roll Period
T  =
3,68
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,06
G's  (Very nice)
Stability Index
SI =
1,19
Initial Metacentric height
GMo =
0,4
m
Righting Arm 10º
RA10 =
0,07
m
Righting Arm 20º
RA20 =
0,13
m
Righting Arm 30º
RA30 =
0,17
m


Oct 28, 2006
From Val Brown

Boat name: Northern Light
Boat Make Model: Nauticat 36
Hull Length: 35' 7"
Waterline Length: 30' 10"
Beam (Maximum): 10' 10"
Total Draught: 5' 3"
Body Draugth amidships: 4' approx??
Displacement: 17600 lbs
Ballast: 6600 lbs
Sail Area: 821
Engines HP: 90
Comments: Great Site. I will send a couple of photos. Thanks

On my side (Guillermo), here some estimated numbers for her:

Length/Beam Ratio
(Lwl+Loa)/2B =
3,07
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,38
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
267,88
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
19,42
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
5,11
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
7,44
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
8,47
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
1,14
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,67
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
35,05
Heft  Ratio
HF =
1,32
Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
149
º        
Roll Period
T  =
3,46
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,07
G's
Initial Metacentric height
GMo =
0,52
m
Righting Arm 10º
RA10 =
0,09
m
Righting Arm 20º
RA20 =
0,16
m
Righting Arm 30º
RA30 =
0,22
m

 


Oct 25, 2006
Although received some days ago, I waited for the pictures to post this one.
 From Sotiris Priftis, in Greece

Boats name: CPTN KOSTAS P.
Boat Make Model: TRADITIONAL TREHANTIRI
Hull Length: 11,80 m
Waterline Length: 9.95 m
Beam (Maximum): 3,90 m
Total Draught: 1,10 m
Body Draugth amidships: 0,8 m
Displacement: 11,8 tn dry
Ballast: 1,8 tn
Sail Area: 30,5 m2
Engines HP: 96Kw 130 CV DIN
Comments: This is a traditional Greek trehantiri boat build in GRP with luxurius mahogany insides,sleeps 4 in comfort.
Cruising speed 8,5 Knts.
Equiped with POSEIDON nozzle propultion and bowthruster.

On my side (Guillermo), here some estimated numbers for her:
Length/Beam Ratio
L/B =
2,79
L=( Lwl+Loa)/2Bmax
Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,15
Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
334,11
Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
5,98
Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
4,99
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
7,66
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
5,82
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
0,76
Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,73
Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
38,83
Heft Ratio
HF =
1,28

Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
114
º
Roll Period
T =
3,68
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,08
G's
Stability Index
SI =
0,94

Initial Metacentric height
GMo =
0,64
M
Righting Arm 10º
RA10 =
0,11
M
Righting Arm 20º
RA20 =
0,2
M
Righting Arm 30º
RA30 =
0,27
M



Oct 24, 2006
From Ben Eckensweiler, in Owen Sound, Canada
Great site!!! I would like to add the motorsailer I own.
http://www.bruceroberts.com/public/HTML/descriptions/PCF40_description.htm
Thanks
Ben


Sept 15, 2006

Pierre Houin sent to me more info on more motorsailers. I've posted some at the Monohulls page. Thanks a lot, Pierre!

Don Cameron was so kind to tell Erling Viksund about this site...Here my answer to him

Dear Don,
Thanks a lot for your kind contact with Erling and his information.
I'm still missing Lwl and amount of ballast, but making some estimatives I get the following:
Lh =
9,5
m
Lwl =
8,7
m
Bmax =
3,2
m
Bwl =
2,88
m
Draught =
1,2
m
Hull D =
0,60
m
Disp =
6345
kg
Ballast =
2250
kg
Sail area =
47
m2
Power =
35
HP

Beam/Length Ratio
B/L =
2,84


Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,35


Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
268,75


Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
13,94


Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
2,5
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
7,16
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
7,34
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
1,03


Capsize Safety Factor
CSF =
1,74


Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
31,94


Heft Ratio
HF =
1,27


Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
123
º
Roll Period
T =
3,09
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,08
G's
Stability Index
SI =
0,96


Probably the real thing will be not that far from this. From these numbers it's evident she's a safe, seaworthy and comfortable boat, and even a reasonable performer under sail due to the PMS number. An small boat capable of great things as she has thoroughly proved. Not the same as modern overcanvased lightweights, nice for club weekend regattas but not for serious cruising.
All the best.


September 14, 2006
From Silver Donald Cameron:
Hi, there:
What a wonderful site you have! I've never seen so much motorsailer information in one place. Thank you so much.
One correction: the correct spelling is not Vicksund, but Viksund. I  have a Viksund MS-33 (also known as a Viksund Goldfish 31). Details about the boat (and the model, and the Viksund company) are at www.silverdonaldcameron.ca/magnus.html
..............................
Thanks again. I'm going to spend a lot of time exploring your site!
Cheers,
SDC


August 27, 2006
Pierre Houin kindly sent to me info on the STRONG 45, a very nice boat.
Here my answer to him:

Dear Pierre,
Thanks a lot for your kind info on the Strong 45. I didn't know about her.
I have analized the available info at the builder's web pages, as well as info from some other designs from her designer's (de Villiers), and I find this boat, being a very nice cruiser, maybe cannot be considered a proper pilothouse motorsailer, as she seems to have not an inside steering position (Although most probably this can be easily solved) and engine power is somewhat low by today's tendencies, with a rated 54 HP, giving a power/displacement ratio of 1,75 (or 10,50 as per my formula).
In my opinion she'd rather be considered a proper raised saloon ocean cruiser (RSOC), with very nice parametrs. Doing some guessings (Ballast amount is not available, among other data), I got the following:

Lh =
13,44
m
Lwl =
12,5
m
Bmax =
4,15
m
Bwl =
3,74
m (guess)
Draught =
2
m
HD =
0,5
m (guess)
Disp =
13990
kg
Ballast =
4896
kg (guess)
Sail area =
96
m2
Power =
54
HP

Beam/Length Ratio ((LWL + LH)/2) / Bmax)

B/L =
3,13


Ballast/Disp Ratio
W/Disp =
0,35


Displacement/Length Ratio
D/L =
200


Sail Area/Disp. Ratio
SA/D =
16,8


Power/ Disp. Ratio
HP/D =
1,75
HP/ton
Hull speed
HSPD =
8,58
Kn
Potential Maximum Speed
PMS =
9,16
Kn
Velocity Ratio
VR =
1,07


Comfort Safety Factor
CSF =
1,74


Motion Comfort Ratio
MCR =
34,83


Heft Ratio
HF =
1,18










Angle of Vanishing Stability
AVS =
116
º
Roll Period
T =
3,47
Sec
Roll Acceleration
Acc =
0,09
G's
Stability Index
SI =
0,84


The only worrying here is the Angle of Vanishing Stability, as 116º is low, but most probably the real thing is much higher (maybe 135º or even greater) if the saloon winds can be considered waterthight in a capsize.
Anyhow I will include her in my motorsailers list, as she's in a border zone and she's a very nice boat.
All the best.
Guillermo.


Also from Pierre:
" I saw you put the mercator 105 in your list but do you know the mercator 40 designed by guy ridadeau dumas , made for travelling all over the world ( extreme to extreme ) , inspirated by the joshua of bernard moitessier , considesred as the quasi perfect travelling boat by magazines. i don't know if you can consider it as a motorsailer but you should take a look at him on www.mercator56.com "

Guillermo's note: I've added today some info on this boat within the same space as the Mercator 105, but referring to Guy Ribadeau Dumas' site and Sailingnow pages, as it seems there is something strange about the 'parentship' of this boat, because naval architect Julien Marin is stated at Mercator boatyard's pages as the designer of Mercator 40.1 as well as in his own pages. Very confusing. Not the same boat?



August 03 2006
Fred and Cheryl Johnson send info on their Schucker 440 "ISLAND TIME"
Thanks a lot to you both!


July 21 2006
From friend Dennis Griffin
Ahoy,
Thanks for the GREAT photo collection of Pilot House Monohulls
Thought you might like to add one more:
Morgan MotorSailor
Out Island 33'
1980-1981
Morgan Yachts, Largo, Florida
Built: 31
Best wishes,
Dennis Griffin

28.06.2006
From Silvano Cometta, in Switzerland
Dear Guilermo,
I found your webpage www.xente.mundo-r.com/motorsailers/index.htm . I suggest you add an excellent boat made in Germany, The Sirius (www.sirius-werft.de/EN/sirius.html) to your list of Monohulls motorsailors. My boat is a Sirius 36DS (www.consultit.ch/Ambra/Home.htm) and it is absolutely fabulous.
Best regards,
Silvano


11.06.2006
From John Davey, searching for info on Mazzoli Delfin 980 motorsailer
Guillermo
On your 'monohull' page you show a photo of a Mazzoli Delfin 9.80 motorsailer. I would appreciate any additional information you can give me about this design (especially sailing characteristics) or contact details of anyone who has owned one, sailed in one, or knows anything about the boat or the designer.
Thanks for your excellent site.
Kind regards
John Davey
If any of you has more info on this boat, you may contact John at:    johndaveyNOSPAM@xtra.co.nz
(Remove NOSPAM from address)


I've opened a thread on containerable motorsailers at Boatdesign.net Forums.
Visit: http://boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?t=11797


From Will Rogers, Container Yachts President
Dear Mr. Gefaell:
I found your very interesting website on motorsailers. After seeing your site, I thought you might be interested in what we are doing here in the United States. My company Container Yachts, LLC is building a 39 ft. Robert Perry designed pilothouse motorsailer that can be shipped in a standard high cube container. The prototype boat "Inbox" is schedule to be launched in August on the west coast of the US. The series production boats are being built in Croatia with the first boats to be delivered in early 2007. Our website www.containeryachts.com has a complete look at our boat and the concept for shipping to far off cruising grounds. We would love to be added to your site if it possible. We are located in Middletown, Rhode Island in the United States but I would be more than happy to coordinate a time to talk about this boat and motorsailers in general.
Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you soon.
Best regards,
Will Rogers
President
Container Yachts
1272 West Main Rd
Middletown, RI 02842
401-851-7925 Office
401-851-7927 Fax
401-864-0492 Mobile
info@containeryachts.com
www.containeryachts.com

Note from Guillermo: Container Yachts are building 'InBox' the prototype for the Far Harbour 39 Mortorsailer, a very interesting and new concept allowing you to freightthe boat into a 40' container anywhere in the world where you desire to cruise. Designer is well renowned Robert H. Perry


 
FAR HARBOUR 39


15.05.2006
From Friend Fred Wales, proud owner of Marina 85  "Tupilak"
Guillermo:
We corresponded back in January about the Marina 85 "Tupilak."
You gave me some valuable information relative to the lack of proper speed through the water from my 28 HP engine. Using the information I determined that my engine was showing signs of fuel starvation and most likely had the wrong pitch on the prop. I repitched the prop from 16 X 13 inches to 16 X 11 inches, since the local prop shop computer indicated that as a more positive pitch. I also found out that after relaunching the boat for the season and not seeing the performance difference expected that the fuel lift
pump was not pumping fully and probably had not been doing so for a long time. So the result is that with the new pitch and a new fuel lift pump we easily achieve hull speed of about 16.5 knots at 2550 RPM with the 28HP Volvo.
Your efforts at gathering information so comparisons can be accurately made to similar boats allowed me to get the proper performance from my engine that it should have had. Thank you very much for your efforts and the success to all of us that results.

Fred Wales



15.04.2006
From Michael Wills
Congratulations on your website! I sense a growing interest in motorsailing in North America (perhaps in Europe it didn’t decline).
I own a 1975 Winga 25 (so called “ family four”). How it got to North America I’m not sure.
It is much like an Albin of the same size but I don’t see a Winga 25 on your site. Most internet hits about the Winga 25 are in Swedish and I find them difficult if not impossible to follow.
After a Folkboat I find the Winga unexciting,stable and dry. Perfect for me at this point. I sail the Bay of Quinte in Lake Ontario (one of the Great Lakes)
Good sailing
Michael
Note from Guillermo: I added the Winga 25 to the list. Tanks a lot, Michael.

13.04.2006
From Leo Hill
Maybe these too for your motorsailers listings?
http://www.de-gier.nl/createsite/prod/createprod.asp?b_id=6158&page=1&rs_prod_id=3228
http://www.de-gier.nl/createsite/prod/createprod.asp?b_id=6158&page=1&rs_prod_id=3226
You have a great site and I visit (and dream) often.
Thank you.
Leo Hill
Note from Guillermo: I added these motorsailers to the list. Tanks a lot, Leo.

18.03.06
More from Marco
Dear Guillermo,
Albatross was a dream for me, about 15 years ago; but I was young, and without money!
The motorsailer was produced in Finland, but I think that now is out of production.
The shipyard address is www.albatross.fi
Note from Guillermo: I've contacted the boatyard to find out with them.


01.03.2006
From Marco Migliavacca
Dear mr Gefaell,
some years ago I visited a little , nice motorsailer, the Albatross; I’m sending a image to you. Do you know this boat, and what do you think about it!


Seems to me like a Sea Finn model. Anybody may confirm?
12.03.2006  -Guillermo-



01.03.2006
From Capt. Shane St. Clair:

Great Motor Sailing Site! I took over the loose Fales Association from a late Navigator owner and would love your help getting the word out. They are a great boat and I have successfully been chartering mine for the past two years.
Thanks again for your site.
Capt. Shane St. Clair
Scovare Expeditions, Inc.
P.O. Box 22707
Portland, OR 97269
971-219-5797
www.sailscovare.com


With data kindly provided by Shane, I got this numbers for the Fales 38 Navigator:
Displacement / Length ratio: 312.55, so a heavy one, but not that much.
Sail Area / Displacement ratio: 10.00, so undercanvased for the displacement, quite usual in this type of motorsailers, although Shane uses an 840 sqft chute for light air sailing, as seen in the image.
Power / Displacement ratio: 16.55, pretty good.
Hull speed: 7.88 kn. Shane states he can get 8.5 knots out of her.
Capsize Screen ratio: 1.56 so the boat seems to be quite sure.
Comfort ratio: 45.59 This only serves to compare with boats of similar size and type. The higher the better.
Guillermo.




22.12.2005
Ken Chapman is willing to start a Mariner 50 owners association.
If you are interested you may contact Ken at:  chapmancharters@sbcglobal.net

Ken's Mariner 50 "Dream Quest"


10.12.2005
From friend Alberto, in Chile
Dear Guillermo: I just want to thank you, from Chile, for your wonderful Motorsailers&Motorsailing web site.
I really enjoy it.
Best regards
Alberto Haristoy

07.12.2005
More from Einar:
Hi again Guillermo
You got me almost right.
I putting in a picture of the Goldfish, from the original brochure, as well as a picture of my own vessel.
Things to do, while waiting for the season.
Have a nice day!
Regards
Einar

Einar's Vicksund 31
Vicksund 31 Goldfish.


06.12.2005
From friend Einar K. Selvig:
Hi
Thank you for a nice page.
Inspired me to add some information.
I want to draw attention to Viksund boats. You have two of them on your list: the 27 and Colombi 27. These are aactually the same. The one labelled Viksund 27, the dutch styled, has a home-made pilot-house put on top of it, but is otherwise similar.
Viksund have three boats that have been built in versions carrying sails: 25, 27 and 31 feet respectivly. The page below has a pretty complete listing, and pictures.
http://www.viksund.no/forum/viewforum.php?f=12
The 31 . or Viksund MS 33 Goldfish as it has been labellled in European markets, is by far the most genuine motorsailer.
regards
Einar K. Selvig

Note from Guillermo: I removed one of the Visunds 27 and added a Viksund 31, thanks to this info. Tanks a lot, Einar.


15.10.2005
From Mike Galante, owner of Fales Navigator 32 "Somewhere"
I wanted to point out that as an owner of a Fales Navigator 32 Motorsailor, your picture of a Fales Motorsailor is of the 38 foot model and NOT the 32, just to clarify.
Great website.
Thanks
Mike Galante
1975 Fales Navigator 32, "Somewhere"


13.10.2005
More from friend Dave Herndon
Guilermo,
The reason that I am emailing you is that I recently attended the Annapolis, MD Sailboat Show and where Nimble Boat Company had and exhibit. Nimble Boats makes two light-weight pilothouse motorsailers that both come in a variety of layouts. These boats were designed by the well-known naval architect, Ted Brewer. I almost purchased a Nimble Kodiak motorsailer several years ago, but the owner of the company died and the company went out of business. After that I purchased my Fisher 25, which was a much better choice for my use.
Nimble Boats had now restarted up again and still makes the two pilothouse motorsailers (Kodiak and Wanderer). These are relatively light-displacement motorsailers, and the smaller of the two, the 27 foot Kodiak, is trailerable. The larger model is called the Wanderer. A very unique option in the Kodiak is a chart table in the pilothouse that easily converts back and forth to a head with shower.
I thought that you might desire information on Nimble pilothouse motorsailers to add to you web page. I have attached brochures in PDF on both the Kodiak and the Wanderer.
If you desire additional information on Nimble Boat Pilothouse Motorsailer, contact the new owner, Dave Junkins at Nimbleboatsales@aol.com. When I talked to him at the boat show, I told him that he should contact you and provide you photos and information.
The web page address of Nimble Boats is www.nimblemidatlantic.com.
I hope the above information is helpful to you. Keep up the great work on your motorsailer web page.
Dave Herndon
_____________________________
David H. Herndon
Owner, Wayward Wind (1978 Fisher Motorsailer)
469 Long Lane Farm
White Stone, VA 22578-2100

Home/Office Phone: (804) 435-2056
Cell Phone: (804) 761-0409
Email: dhherndon@aol.com


27.06.05
From friend Bruce, who sent info on unknown (to me) motorsailers.
I am armchair shopping and sailing on the Canadian Prairies while trying to figure out what to do next...... At this point in my life... it is time to do something totally different... stop dreaming life away etc. I have found my past boat ownership experiences to be one of finding holes in the water into which to throw my money. If I am going to do that, well maybe it would be fitting to at least get the benefit of living on what is costing me $. Your www discussions on the motorsailer and upcoming changes in the demographics which will lead to their increased popularity, also suggests to me that there may be a market for purchasing these and moving them to places such as the US NW and BC for reale at a profit.
Take Care,
Bruce

I answered Bruce thanking him and telling him one of the motorsilers was rather, in my opinion, a motorboat with auxiliary sails. Bruce answers:

Frankly I am truly in awe of the amount of focus and work you put into how to determine the difference between a motorsailer and a notor boat with sails. I got to looking at Fales Navigators with this in mind. There is one fellow in Oregon who has sailed a '38 extensively and claims to be very impressed, even with an extenssive background sailing conventional sailboats. He used one of these on which to base his wildnerness seascape tours in Alaska. What do you think on the Navigator 32 & 38 boats? They look awfully much like a small trawler with stabalizing sails to me. I can find no discussions, good or bad on them anywhere other than what I have stated above. There are no Navigators that I have seen in my travels on the west coast of Canada.
Take Care,
Bruce

I've found this at Latitude 38's pages:

A STOUT BOAT WITH HEADROOM
In the September Letters, Brian Mitchell wrote about trying to find the maximum headroom and bunk size in a boat under 40 feet. In the late '70s and early '80s there was a fellow named Fales who built the Fales Explorer and the Fales Navigator. He was tall, so the 38-footer had 6'5" inch headroom and a long V-berth. She was a ketch, well laid out for cruising, and appears to have been well-built.
In January of '99, I sailed a Fales 38 across the Gulf of Mexico with owners Jim Williams and Cynthia Gillette. During the 800-mile trip, we were hit by a Norther with winds blowing 35 and gusting to 40. The Fales handled the conditions well under a reefed mizzen and staysail, while being driven through the rough seas at six knots by the Monitor windvane. I found her to be well-balanced, comfortable and strong. Ironically, the boat's name is Latitude - and she sailed as though she had an attitude! She is currently on the East Coast with several sisterships.
While in Houston, I watched a couple named Ed and Glenna prepare a sistership named Meridian for cruising. The 38s are not going to win many races, but they have the interior volume typical of most 40-footers. Glenna did a wonderful job with Meridian's interior. The couple then took their no nonsense, stout cruiser to the Bahamas and the Chesapeake....
Will La Fleur and Ann Gauntt



26.04.05
Interesting questions from a friend.

Dear Guillermo,

I read your motorsailer page and found it very informative. There is still one thing that has been puzzling me though, and I was wondering if you might be able to help me.

Most of the literature I’ve seen boasts that a particular motorsailer has the range of a sailboat with all of the conveniences of a trawler. When I look at the boat’s specs though, it seems that it has nowhere near enough fuel capacity to venture long distances unless the boat is sailing without power most of the time. For example, the Northeast 400 by Cabo Rico and the Northshore series by Fisher all seem to have “power-only” ranges of about 700-1,000 nm. Assuming this range can be enhanced even by 40% when the benefit of motorsailing is added in, these boats still won’t have sufficient range to cross oceans unless they are sailed most of the time and the engine is used primarily in calms and to recharge the batteries. If that’s the case, why not buy a pilothouse sailboat and benefit from its better sailing performance?

I agree with the statement by Bill Kimley on your website that most motorsailers work best when the engine is running, but let’s take a look at the specs for his Mandarin 52. The Mandarin 52 has a 220 hp Cummins diesel engine and carries 600 gallons of diesel fuel (more than twice the capacity of most other motorsailers). At 1,660 rpm (the optimal engine speed recommended by Cummins) the Mandarin 52 will burn 2.7 gph and make 7.2 knots, giving it a range of about 1,600 nm. At 1,000 rpm the Mandarin 52 will burn 1 gph and make 5 knots, giving it a range of 3,000 nm. It seems to me that this lower speed won’t put enough of a load on the engine though, and you would risk building up varnish on the cylinder walls by running at this speed for extended periods. Assuming you could put a sufficient load on the engine making 6 knots and burning 1.9 gph, then the Mandarin 52 would have a “power-only” range of about 1,900 nm. If you’re able to average an additional 2.5 knots with the sails up, then your range would increase to 2,700 nm, enough to cross the Atlantic with a refueling stop in the Azores, but not enough for a long Pacific crossing. All of this also presupposes that you don’t want to run the air conditioning, which would require generator usage as well.

All of this has me a bit confused. It seems to me that the longer you travel, the more that the motorsailer becomes a somewhat inefficient sailboat. Is this the proper way to look at it?
Thanks for your help.


Answer from Guillermo:
Dear friend,
First of all I have to say is that stating that a motorsailer has the sailing range of a sailing boat with the conveniences of a trawler, sounds, to me, somewhat exagerated. Trawlers are motorboats with huge interiors due to generous hull volumes and big superstructures. We cannot get that kind of spaces if we want to get a proper motorsailer, able to sail more or less efficiently.

Motorsailers should be, in my opinion, an hybrid among sailing boats and motor boats, with amplier volumes than those of a pure sailing boat (And to my taste with a nice pilothouse!) to make them more livable and able to carry a generous cargo; have manegeable sails but able to easily develope hull speed under sail alone; have a propeller-engine combination allowing for an efficient motoring and with power enough to reach hull speed, as well as some extra muscle to beat dead to winward in a strong gale force (9) under control, or even in a storm (10), in protected waters. This means, to me, an SA/D ratio from 13 to 15 and a HP/(D/1000) ratio from 2 to 2.5

I don't think motorsailers, just only because they are motorsailers, are supposed to be able to cross an Ocean under engine alone, because that will depend mainly on the size of the boat and, for sure, a 40 footer (as the ones you mention) is not big enough to have designed-in fuel tanks to carry the necessary fuel, if the designer wants to provide enough space for a comfortable living. A motoring range of 1000 miles seems to me quite reasonable for a 40 feet motorsailer. If we want more range, we should go for a bigger boat, in my opinion.

To motor the whole of the time for an ocean crossing is not sensible, not necessary at all, if we have a boat with some kind of an efficient hull and sailing rig. It's not reasonably to expect zero, or almost zero, wind for the whole of the passage. Maybe we can get caught in the doldrums, certainly, and we'll need a nice engine and enough fuel to take us out of there, but that's only a few days problem, most probably.

And it is neither reasonable to motorsail the whole time of a crossing. Why is that supposed to be necessary? Bill Kimley is right when he states motorsailers sail generally better with engine running, but that's when beating to winward or maybe even in a close reach in certain cases. With winds from the beam to the stern that assertion does not apply if the boat is what I understand as a proper motorsailer (Except if winds are very light, of course, when you should be only motoring). I think it would be quite improbable that, for most of the usual well planned crossings, we find head winds the whole of the time. Most probably we'd plan a passage to maximize reaching or running rhumbs, allowing to sail efficiently under sails alone.

And motorsailers have not to be necessarily heavy weights and poor wind performers nowadays. Modern materials and equipments allow for lighter ones (D/Lwl ratio in the 250-300 range) with hull lines pretty efficient under sail alone.

I hope to have been able to answer your questions.


22.04.2005
From friend Trim at Boatdesign forums.
I've a look at your website and your calculations.
Concerning the formulas, they give a quite good mean of comparison.
But what will be interesting is to find a mean to convert the power you can reach with sails in HP to directly compare it to engine thus you can really consider the qualification of your boat as a real motorsailer !
Having verified on Fisher Tech Sheet, Fisher 37 have a 100HP engine.
Bruce Roberts just reply me and suggests for his design SPRAY 370 as motorsailer the following ratio : 4HP for 1000 lbs displacement which is twice higher than the ratio of Banjer ! but I can't reach having indications on Sail Area ! If I decide to buy SPRAY 370 study plans I'll send you all the values you want to complete your pages with this design !
Trim

Answer from Guillermo.
Dear Trim:
Thanks a lot for visiting my motorsailers page and your interesting observations. As a matter of fact I'm trying to reach a simple formula of Sail Area as a function of Lwl. This is tricky but, with some assumptions maybe I'll get there. Then it will be only a matter of eliminating Lwl among the two equations. Maybe next days I'll find time for this.
On the engine power you say Bruce indicates, I respect his opinion, but I find the figures somewhat high. 5 times displacement in tons seems to me quite adecuate. Not that you cannot go over that, for sure, but I don't think you need as much as 100 HP to move a 37 footer even considering head winds and sea.
Banjers with Perkins 6354 have 95 HP and I consider them somewhat overpowered, as happens with Fisher 37. Specially if we think in actual and foreseeable prices of fuel!
If you send to me the values for the boat you are planning to build, I'd be most grateful.
Best regards,
Guillermo.


26.02.05
From friend Dave Herndon, in USA, proudly owning "Wayward Wind", a gorgeous Fisher 25.
(He sent this message after having sent his boat's data by means of the form upwards in this page and my mail thanking and asking for some more information on propeller, etc. He also sent a lot of additional info about Wayward Wind. Thanks Dave!)

 
Guillermo,
In response to your questions to me, I can give you the following answers and other information:
The current engine in the vessel is the original 1978 Yanmar 2QM20 diesel that puts out 22 HP. Because engine is very old (but in good condition) I don't normally run it faster than 2100 RPM which reaches hull speed (6.1 knots) in fair weather. My normal cruising speed is 5.5 knots which is 1800 RPM. I have only run it into strong headwinds (Force 8+) a few times and it only slowed down about 1 knot. My engine will go to up to about 2800 RPM (which is probably the full 22 HP) and at this engine speed (in calm water) it reaches about 6.6 knots (well over hull speed). The bottom line is that she performs very well under engine power going to windward even though the engine is probably putting out well less than its rated 22 HP. The Fisher 25s that are being made today are powered with a Yanmar 27 HP diesel.

Wayward Wind performs very well under sail when the relative wind speed is 12 knots or more. Her best performance (hull speed+) is reached when the wind speed hits around 18-22 knots. She does not do well in winds under 12 knots and like most motorsailers does not really sail well into the wind (although when the winds are strong, I can sail into apparent wind at 45-50 deg and obtain 5+ knots speed). I entered a race for old classic sailboats last year (about 110 boats) and came in around 75th. All the other boats were pure sailboats. I was the last boat to finish but all the boats behind me either blew out their sails or turned over. The wind speeds were around 18 knots (just right for me). I was hardly healing and most of the other boats were way over.

The best thing that I did when I restored this boat was change all three sails to roller-reefing furling. When I first purchased the Fisher, I was interested in making all the sails roller-reefing-furling. I checked out all the standard American firms (Harken, etc.) and the pricing was prohibitive and most of systems that they made would work for forestays but not for masts. I then found Reefurl on line. Reefurl is an Australia firm and is the largest manufacturer and provider of roller reefing and furling systems for large and small, cruising and racing sailboats in the Southwest pacific (Australia and New Zealand) area. Reefurl equipment is now selling strongly in the USA. Reefurl maintains a stocked warehouse in the USA to expedite shipments in the USA.. The Reefurl System is significantly simpler and less expensive than competing systems. There is only one moving part, the one-piece sail-track-foil/furling-drum. Reefurl systems have no bearings, swivels, or shackles to wear out and, because of its unique construction, there is no possibility of halyard wrap. The system can easily be installed over an existing headstay in half an hour. The systems are so simple, they can also easily be adapted for use on masts (mains and mizzens) with the addition of after-mast stays using simple custom parts made by Reefurl. This allows all sails to have the capability for roller reefing/furling from the cockpit area. For additional information on Reefurl and their fine roller reefing/furling equipment, see their webpage http://www.furlings.com/ or contact the owner/CEO, Rogin Taylor, directly at reefurlAU@furlings.com. I have found that I use the sails considerably more with the Reefurl systems. Before I had these systems, I would only sail when I had the time and crew to remove sail covers and raise the sail, and reef as needed. Now within a few minutes I can unfurl, reef, and/or furl the sails single handed without going on deck. Before Reefurl I had the sail up less than 20% of the time. I now put the sails up anytime I can get them to draw (about 85% of the time)

I am out of town at this time and do not have information on gearbox ratio, propeller pitch, etc.
I hope the above information is helpful to you. Feel free to post this information (along with my contact information) on your webpage.

Dave Herndon
----------------------------------
David H. Herndon
469 Long Lane Farm
White Stone, VA 22578-2100
Phone: (804) 435-2056
Cell: (804) 761-0409
Email: dhherndon@aol.com